UNIT 3: LESSON 12:
How do characters affect the plot of a story?
READING/COMPREHENSION/FLUENCY

Main Selection: "The Science Fair" by Susan Wojciechowski

science fair

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Realistic fiction is a story with events that could happen in real life.

Target Skill: Story Structure

Story structure is the setting, characters, and plot of a story. Understanding the elements of story structure can help readers enjoy and understand stories. Readers can use a story map to record what they are learning about the characters, setting, and plot.

Target Strategy: Visualize

To visualize means to see pictures in your mind of a story's setting, characters, and actions. Visualizing the story structure helps you to understand how characters, story events, and the setting look, feel, and sound.

Fluency: Stress: Emphasis

When good readers read aloud, they know which words to emphasize to add meaning to the text. Understanding the text helps readers know which words to stress. Punctuation and italics can also help readers know which words and phrases to stress.

PRACTICE/RESOURCES

Parent Support: Reading

Parent Support: Fluency

Story Map

Visualizing

Elements of a Story

Understanding Story Structure

Visualize

VOCABULARY

Target Strategy: Idioms

An idiom is an expression with a special meaning different from the usual meanings of the individual words. Idioms cannot be understood from the literal meanings of the words themselves.

Target Vocabulary:

                • creative - inventive and imaginative
                • report - to tell or write about something
                • charts - information sheets with tables or graphs
                • educational - providing knowledge
                • presentation - a report or display
                • certificate - document recognizing an accomplishment
                • impressive - generating wonder or amazement
                • erupt - to burst out

PRACTICE/RESOURCES

Word List

Vocabulary Dominoes

Vocabulary Concentration

Vocabulary Tic-Tac-Toe

Idioms

PHONICS/SPELLING

Phonics: Homophones

Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

Spelling: Homophones

BASIC:

hole, whole, its, it's, hear, here, won
one, our, hour, their, there, fur, fir

REVIEW:

road, rode

CHALLENGE:

peace, piece

PRACTICE/RESOURCES

Word List

Spelling Tic-Tac-Toe

Spelling Bingo

Homophones

Homophone Match

GRAMMAR/WRITING

Grammar: More Proper Nouns

Nouns that name a particular person or pet are called proper nouns. Always begin a proper noun with a capital letter.
Nouns that name a particular place are proper nouns. Particular places include streets, cities and towns, states, countries, schools, parks, river, and lakes. Always being the names of particular places with a capital letter.
Other proper nouns, such as geographical names and historical periods also need to be capitalized. Some examples: Grand Canyon, Great Smoky Mountain, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance.

Writing: Write to Narrate: Humorous Poem

Focus Trait: Word Choice

What makes a great humorous poem?
The use of onomatopoeia and exact words help the reader picture what is happening and make the poem lively.
The topic is presented at the beginning of the poem and captures the reader's imagination.
Funny words and situations keep the reader amused.
The actions are in order, and the characters are clearly described.
The poem has a conclusion, which is often a final action.

Writing Process

Writing a great descriptive paragraph or humorous poem involves many steps.
1. Prewrite: Complete a web map in order to get your ideas on paper.
2. Draft: Begin a draft using the prewrite web map. Write a topic sentence that tells the main idea, and supporting sentences that use exact words and sensory details to support the main idea. End the paragraph with a closing sentence that restates the topic sentence in a different way.
3. Revise and Edit: Revise your writing by using exact words and sensory details. Edit your paragraph by proofreading for spelling, capitals and punctuation.
4. Final Copy: After revising and editing, write a final copy of your paragraph.

PRACTICE/RESOURCES

Parent Support: Writing

Proper Nouns

Organizer

 

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